Interfusion Mage (5e Class)

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This content deviates from 5e standards. Its use could dramatically alter campaigns, take extreme care. DesignDisclaimer.png
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This content intends to provide a different experience, or goes beyond the scope of the anticipated subjects and situations, than the 5e rules were intended to handle. Some portions of the content below may not be what you expect from traditional game content. When implementing this content, DMs and Players should read over all the information carefully, and consider the following specific notes of interest:
This class relies heavily on the use and destruction of environmental objects that your DM may not have planned for. Discuss using this class with your DM before you bring it to the table, as your DM will need to take care to provide you with viable options for your class features.


Interfusion Mage[edit]

Chunks of rock bounce from goblin to goblin, having broken themselves off their mother stone at the command of a nearby human. Their arrows seemingly bounce off the human, protected by a thin layer of stone covering their body. The human launches another volley of stone discs, eliminating the rest of the goblins even as the stone breaks into pieces and their armor disappears.

The guards find themselves outnumbered by the marauding cultists, their numbers dwindling, when the surroundings fires suddenly spring to life, sweeping through the cultists and burning them alive. The tiefling controlling the flames suddenly directs them towards the guards, but instead of harming them the flames surround their weapons, empowering them with extra strength and speed needed to drive back the heretics.

Stalking through the darkened rooms of a mansion, a pair of murderous bandits make their way to the master bedroom. Then, the living room around them comes to life, chairs exploding and silverware spinning into a deadly cloud of sharp wood and tools. As the bandits attempt to escape, a ceramic pot breaks itself into a line across the doorway, the bits and pieces rising around the intruder's feet and trapping them in place while the home's family prepares to finish the job by beating them over the head with their wands, having run out of objects to make explode.

Leaving destruction in their wake, interfusion mages fight using the environment around them as their weapon, not caring for the damage caused to the objects and property they inevitably destroy.

Limited Gifts[edit]

Gifted in the art of magic in a unique way, an interfusion mage lacks the capacity to manipulate the Weave directly. Instead, they must channel their power through a nearby object or energy source to enact their will on the Weave. Without that, they are basically just normal people. Powerful interfusion mages can tap into the potential of objects, turning a seed into a fully-grown tree or a pile of debris into fire, and some can even make a person charge, flee, or walk into fire before they know what's happening. Others instead empower their allies by giving their weapons the gift of fire, or by pulling drawing the latent magical energy of a plant or object into the world to imbue nearby allies with extra strength. Others don't help anyone else but themselves, instead drawing magical potential into themselves and distributing any harm done to them back into the those objects.

Creating an Interfusion Mage[edit]

When making an interfusion mage, consider the personality of the character. What do they care about most? Are some objects too valuable to destroy for their cause, or is everything fair game? Maybe some objects are easy enough to replace that their destruction doesn't matter, or they were just pieces of the environment and didn't matter anyways. Or do they try to avoid destroying objects at all, and go no further than causing them damage? They might even avoid objects altogether and fight with their weapons, interfusing with fire instead of anything that can be destroyed.

Quick Build

You can make an interfusion mage quickly by following these suggestions. First, Intelligence should be your highest ability score, followed by Dexterity or Constitution. Second, choose the sage background. Third, choose the two daggers and arcane focus, the hide armor, and the explorer's pack.

Class Features

As a Interfusion Mage you gain the following class features.

Hit Points

Hit Dice: 1d6 per Interfusion Mage level
Hit Points at 1st Level: 6 + Constitution modifier
Hit Points at Higher Levels: 1d6 (or 4) + Constitution modifier per Interfusion Mage level after 1st

Proficiencies

Armor: Light armor
Weapons: Simple weapons, martial weapons
Tools: None
Saving Throws: Constitution, Intelligence
Skills: Choose three from Arcana, Deception, History, Insight, Investigation, Medicine, Nature, Persuasion, and Religion

Equipment

You start with the following equipment, in addition to the equipment granted by your background:

Table: The Interfusion Mage

Level Proficiency
Bonus
Features Advanced Interfusions
1st +2 Interfusion -
2nd +2 Interfusion Preference -
3rd +2 Advanced Interfusions 1
4th +2 Ability Score Improvement 1
5th +3 1
6th +3 Interfusion Preference feature 1
7th +3 Indignance 2
8th +3 Ability Score Improvement 2
9th +4 2
10th +4 Interfusion Preference feature 2
11th +4 Empowered Interfusion 2
12th +4 Ability Score Improvement 3
13th +5 3
14th +5 Extended Interfusion 3
15th +5 Interfusion Preference feature 3
16th +5 Ability Score Improvement 3
17th +6 3
18th +6 Multi-Interfusion 4
19th +6 Ability Score Improvement 4
20th +6 Interfusion Preference feature 4

Interfusion[edit]

At 1st level, you can extend your consciousness into the world around you to interfuse with the environment. As an action or a bonus action, choose one object made of stone or wood, one non-creature plant, or one open flame within 30 feet of you. If the object, plant, or open flame you chose is Small, Medium, Large, or Huge, and it is not being worn or carried, you become interfused with it. You remain interfused with that thing until it is destroyed or you use your action or bonus action to end it. Interfusion with the thing also ends if you begin your turn more than 60 feet away from it. You can interfuse with a maximum number of things at the same time equal to your proficiency bonus. As an action, you can cause one of the following effects as appropriate for the the thing you interfused with.

Most of your features require your target to make a saving throw to resist the feature's effects. The saving throw DC is calculated as follows:

Interfusion save DC = 8 + your proficiency bonus + your Intelligence modifier

Discus. Part of the interfused stone breaks off and launches itself at a target within 25 feet. The stone loses 3 hit points and the target makes a Dexterity saving throw. On a failed save, it takes 2d6 bludgeoning damage, and a random creature within 15 feet of the target must make a Dexterity saving throw, taking half the damage on a failed save.

Fireleash. The a portion of the interfused fire, no larger than a Medium creature, leaps to a point within 20 feet of it, extinguishing the area the fire came from. Each creature in the fire's path must succeed on a Dexterity saving throw or take 1d6 fire damage. If the fire leaps into the space of a creature, that creature takes an additional 1d6 fire damage on a failed save, and takes the normal damage on a successful save. The fire is then extinguished if there aren't any flammable objects not being worn or carried for it burn on.

Splinterblast. The interfused wood explodes in a shower of splinters centered on a point within 10 feet of the object. The object is destroyed and each creature in a 5-foot radius sphere centered on that point must succeed on a Dexterity saving throw or take 1d4 piercing damage. Nonmagical armor worn by a creature that failed its save is damaged and takes a permanent and cumulative -1 penalty to the AC it offers. The armor is destroyed if the penalty reduces its AC to 10. The range and radius of this effect increases by 5 feet for each size above Small the object is.

Wild Grasp. The interfused plant whips out a vine at a creature within 20 feet of the plant, attempting to reel it in even as it breaks apart. The plant loses 1 hit point and the creature makes a Dexterity saving throw. On a failed save, it takes 1d6 bludgeoning damage, is pulled next to the plant, and is grappled by the plant until the end of its next turn. A creature cannot escape from this grapple.

Examples of objects and their possible interfusion actions are listed at the end of this article, as well as additional information on what happens to an interfused object when used and how long they tend to last. At the DM's discretion, you can choose multiple rocks, wooden objects, or plants to interfuse with if they are all touching each other, such as a pile of rocks or a thick clump of bushes. This may allow for multiple options of what you can do with the interfused thing or ofr using the interfused thing more times before it is destroyed, as determined by the DM. Regardless of the number of individual objects, interfusing with something in this way counts as a single interfusion. If you can interfuse with other types of objects, you can interfuse with groups of them as well for longer-lasting interfusions. Other creatures cannot interfuse with things that you are interfused with.

An arcane focus makes it easier for you to channel your powers. If you use an interfusion options while holding an arcane focus, you can reroll one damage die each time you roll damage and must use the new result. Additionally, you can use any wooden object that is of a similar shape and size to a wand or staff as if were an arcane focus of that type. For example, a wood ladle or stick could be your wand, and a wood quarterstaff or club could be your staff.

Interfusion Preference[edit]

At 2nd level, you chose a preference for which things you interfuse with. Choose between Energy, Lifeforms, and Objects, all detailed at the end of the class description. Your choice grants you features at 2nd level and again at 6th, 11th, 15th, and 20th level.

Advanced Interfusions[edit]

By 3rd level, you have learned how to interfuse with more complex objects and use them in more complex ways. Choose one of the following interfusion types. It takes an action to cause any effects with an interfused object, and some options allow for multiple different effects to be chosen from.

Bone. You can now interfuse with Bone-type objects and can cause the following effects with them:

Bonelance: The interfused object launches a massive spear made of bone. The object loses 5 hit points and each creature in a 20-foot line originating from the object must succeed on a Dexterity saving throw or take 3d10 piercing damage. This damage ignores resistance to nonmagical piercing damage and treats immunity to nonmagical piercing damage as resistance instead, and it cannot be reduced by features or traits that reduce damage.

Bonewall: The interfused object expands into a wall of bones without being harmed, up to 20 feet long, 10 feet high, and 2 feet thick. The wall blocks vision, and each 5-foot section of the wall counts a separate Bone object. Each section has 5 hit points and weakness to bludgeoning damage.

Book. You can now interfuse with Book-type objects and can cause the following effect with them:

Loredump: The interfused books shove a torrent of information and knowledge into the brain of a creature within 15 feet of the books. The object loses 1 hit point and the creature must succeed on an Intelligence saving throw or take 2d6 psychic damage and be stunned until the end of your next turn.

Fabric. You can now interfuse with Fabric-type objects and can cause the following effects with them:

Constrict: The interfused threads rip apart and form into tight bindings around a creature within 30 feet of the object. The object loses 1 hit point and the creature must succeed on a Strength saving throw or take 1d6 bludgeoning damage and have its speed reduced by half.

Fire. You can now interfuse with objects capable of holding an open flame, including Tiny objects, and can cause the following effect with them, as well as the following effect with interfused Fire-type objects:

Light/Snuff: The interfused object lights on fire in the appropriate place, or the fire is extinguished.

Blazing Weapon: The interfused fire surrounds an ally's weapon, quickening their strikes and burning their targets. One creature within 30 feet of you that is holding a weapon makes an attack against a creature of your choice within range. On a hit, the creature takes the weapon's damage plus 1d6 fire damage, and if there are any flammable objects by their feet, those objects are set on fire.

Liquid. You can now interfuse with objects that contain Liquid-type substances and can cause the following effect with them:

Scalding Rain: The interfused liquid boils and bursts forth from its container at a creature within 20 feet of the object. The container loses 2 hit points and the creature must succeed on a Dexterity saving throw or take 2d6 fire damage. Nonmagical armor worn by a creature that fails its save is damaged and takes a permanent and cumulative -1 penalty to the AC it offers. The armor is destroyed if the penalty reduces its Ac to 10.

Plant. You can now cause the following effect with Plant-type objects, and the second following effect if the Plant object is also Wood:

Vinewrench: The interfused plant releases powerful vines to move a creature within 15 feet of the plant. The plant loses 1 hit point and creature must succeed on a Dexterity saving throw or take 2d6 bludgeoning damage and be moved up to 15 in any horizontal direction, including away from the plant.

Treecall: Nature spirits shift your ally into a better position. A willing creature you can see is moved to within 5 feet of the interfused wood object, and the object loses 2 hit points.

Stone. You can now cause the following effect with Stone-type objects, and gain the following passive benefit while interfused with them:

Rock Shield: The interfused stone releases crumbled bits of rock to protect another creature within 30 feet of you. The stone loses 2 hit points and the creature gains temporary hit points equal to your level. If the creature still has these temporary hit points at the start of your next turn, the crumbled rocks fall and the temporary hit points are lost.

Calcify: Each time you interfuse with a stone object, you gain temporary hit points equal to your proficiency bonus. If you gain temporary hit points from this feature while you already [[5e SRD:|temporary hit points]] from this feature, you can add them together instead of choosing. When an interfusion with a stone object ends, you lose temporary hit points equal to your proficiency bonus. Additionally, you have a +1 bonus to AC for every stone object you are interfused with.

Tools. You can now interfuse with Tools-type objects and can cause the following effects with them:

Barrage: The interfused tools fling themselves in a direction, filling a 10-foot cube originating from the object. The source of the tools is destroyed and each creature in the area must make a saving throw using the AC bonus provided by the armor they are wearing or their natural armor as the modifier for their roll. For example, a creature wearing plate armor would have a +8 modifier to the roll, and a creature with an AC of 15 (natural armor) and a Dexterity of 12 would have a +4 modifier. A creature takes 3d8 bludgeoning, piercing, or slashing damage on a failed save, whichever is most appropriate for the tools being used. The size of the cube increases by 5 feet for each size the source is above Medium.

Trap. You can now interfuse with Trap-type objects and can cause the following effects with them, depending on their material:

Shackle: The interfused metal object lashes out towards a creature within 15 feet of it. The metal loses 5 hit points and the creature must succeed on a Dexterity saving throw or be restrained by the metal until until the end of your next turn.

Sharktrap: The interfused ceramic objects breaks off pieces that turn into magical traps in a line that is 5 feet wide and 15 feet long originating from the object. The object loses 3 hit points. Each 5-foot square is its own trap. The first creature that enters one of these spaces takes 1d6 piercing damage and is restrained until the end of its next turn.

Wood. You can cause the following effect when interfused with two or more Wood-type objects:

Splintersalvo: Two of the interfused wood objects explode in a violent frenzy of murderous splinters, flying to a spot within 15 feet of either object. Both of the objects are destroyed and each creature in a 10-foot radius sphere centered on that spot must succeed on a Dexterity saving throw or take 1d6 piercing damage. Nonmagical armor worn by a creature that failed its save is damaged and takes a permanent and cumulative -2 penalty to the AC it offers. The armor is destroyed if the penalty reduces its AC to 10. The range and radius of this effect are increased by 5 feet for each size above Small each object is, and the damage is increased by 1d6 for each object that is Large or larger. If both objects are Large or larger, the penalty to the armor's AC increases to -3.

Whenever you get the option to learn a new Advanced Interfusion, you can choose one of your old Advanced Interfusion to replace with a different one.

Ability Score Improvement[edit]

When you reach 4th level, and again at 8th, 12th, 16th and 19th level, you can increase one ability score of your choice by 2, or you can increase two ability scores of your choice by 1. As normal, you can't increase an ability score above 20 using this feature.

Indignance[edit]

At 7th level, you begin to exude pure energy, a mark of the power you have but cannot use to its fullest extent. Even though you can still control this energy, it sometimes lashes out at nearby creatures. As a reaction to when a creature comes within 5 feet of you or when you first move to be within 5 feet of a creature during your turn, you can cause that creature to take force damage equal to half your Intelligence modifier, rounded down.

At 15th level, the force damage increases to be equal to your Intelligence modifier (minimum of 1).

Empowered Interfusion[edit]

Starting 11th level, the effects you can cause with your interfusions grow in strength. You add you Intelligence modifier to the first damage roll of each of your interfusions, and each time you would one or more dice for the damage of an interfusion, you roll an additional die of the first type of damage for that interfusion.

Extended Interfusion[edit]

At 14th level, you can interfuse with things from as far away as 45 feet, and you can be up to 90 feet away from an interfused thing before the interfusion ends due to the distance.

Multi-Interfusion[edit]

At 18th level, you can interfuse with things more quickly, and you can end your interfusions more swiftly. You can interfuse with one thing without using an action or bonus action once per turn, and you can end an interfusion with one thing without using an action or bonus action once per turn.

Interfusion Preferences[edit]

Different interfusion mages have different beliefs about interfusion. Some might view it as more of a destructive curse that they carefully use in non-destructive ways, while others fully embrace the chaos and don't mind trashing everything to achieve their goal.

Energy[edit]

Interfusion mages that prefer to interfuse with energy sources are typically one of two things: kind, loving mages who do their best to make as little of a mess as possible with their abilities, or chaotic force of nature that use their expertise with energy to cause even more destruction. An interfuse mage who specializes in this preference might not fall into either archetype, and falls in the middle of the two extremes as they use energy-based interfusions to augment all of their abilities. Whatever the case of their personality, they have incredible amounts of energy themselves, almost to the point where they would appear as magical items to spells and effects that detect such objects.

Improved Interfusions

Starting when you choose this preference at 2nd level, you have an easier time interfusing with certain objects and using their interfusion options. The Constrict and Light/Snuff interfusion options can be used as an action or a bonus action, and once during each of your turns you can interfuse with a Fabric, Fire, or Wood object without using an action or bonus action.

Combustible Energy

Also at 2nd level, you have an innate ability to create and control fire, the most easily accessible source of energy to an interfusion mage. As an action, you can cause a pile of nonmagical flammable objects within 25 feet of you not being worn or carried to burst into flames. The pile chosen must fit in a 5-foot cube, and can be part of a larger pile of objects or debris. If you are not at your maximum number of interfusions, you become interfused with the fire. If a creature is standing in the chosen area, it takes 1d6 fire damage.

In addition, fires that you are interfused with do not require flammable objects to keep on burning after you use Fireleash. They are still extinguished if you end your interfusion with them.

Vigorflow

At 6th level, you pull energy from your interfusions, empowering your physical form. You gain a +1 bonus to weapon damage rolls for each object you are interfused with.

Soulsplitting

At 10th level, your soul is linked to the objects you are interfused with, protecting you from harm. Whenever you take damage, you take 1 less damage for each object you are interfused with and each of those objects loses 1 hit point. If you are interfused with more objects than the amount of damage prevented, all of the objects still lose the hit point.

Infernal Rain

At 15th level, the liquids you interfuse with are imbued with extra potent energy. Damage from the Scalding Rain interfusion option ignores all resistances and immunities, and it incurs an additional -1 penalty to the armor on a worn creature, both magical and nonmagical.

Harmful Aura

At 20th level, the pure energy overflowing from you manifests itself into an aura of pure magical destruction around you. Indignance no longer requires your reaction to use: instead, it deals its damage to every creature that you come within 5 feet or that comes within 5 feet of you. You can choose to not deal this damage to a creature.

Lifeforms[edit]

Interfusion mages that specialize in manipulating living things tend to be more charismatic and outgoing, complimenting their magical abilities with the mundane. They have great control over both plants and people, and can even use the plants they interfuse with to become nearly invisible. Often more evil than good, most of them tend to try to not cause any real harm to the objects or plants they interfuse with because they don't need to: why destroy a perfectly good log when you can make your foes walk right into a hornet's nest?

Improved Interfusions

Starting when you choose this preference at 2nd level, you have an easier time interfusing with certain objects and using their interfusion options. The Bonewall and Treecall interfusion options can be used as an action or bonus action, and once during each of your turns you can interfuse with a Bone, Liquid, or Plant object without using an action or bonus action.

Arches

Also at 2nd level, you can cause seeds to turn into fully-grown plants almost instantly, even those buried deep beneath the ground. As an action while you have at least interfusion remaining, choose an unoccupied 5-foot cube that has no objects within 5 feet of a side of the cube. The cube must be adjacent to the ground, and there must be rock or soil within 1 foot of the bottom side of the cube. A tree bursts through the ground, destroying any flooring or foundation in its path. Each creature of your choice within 15 feet of the new tree must succeed on a Strength saving throw or be restrained by the displaced debris until the end of its next turn. You then interfuse with the tree.

Compulsion

At 6th level, you have learned how to invade the minds of other creatures, controlling their behavior temporarily. As an action, a creature within 30 feet of you must succeed on a Wisdom saving throw or be magically compelled to use its reaction to move up to its speed to a spot you choose that it can see. The creature will not move into an obviously or immediately dangerous situation, such as into a deep pit or through fire, but it will jump into a shallow pit, swim through murky water, enter a dark cave, or step onto a pressure plate that releases a trap, unless it knows that the pressure plate is there and stepping on it will bring it harm. Otherwise, it moves to the designated spot as if it had always planned to go there, and does not realized it was compelled. Creatures immune to being charmed are immune to this effect, and a creature that is not compelled to move in this way realizes what has happened and knows that you were the source of the effect, if it was already aware of you.

Shade

At 10th level, the trees you interfuse with hide from you view, camouflaging you to your surroundings. When you interfuse with a tree, you become invisible for 1 minute or until after you attack or cast a spell. Using an interfusion option is considered casting a spell.

Vine Frenzy

At 15th level, you can cause interfused plants to lash out at everything nearby. Whenever you use a Wild Grasp interfusion on a plant that is at its maximum hit points, you can reduce the plant to 1 hit point instead of making it lose 1 hit point and force each creature of your choice within the interfusion's range to make the save against the interfusion. Creatures that succeed on the save take the interfusion's damage, and creatures that fail the save take an extra 2d6 bludgeoning damage and are restrained while grappled by the plant.

Convulsion

At 20th level, you have become a master of manipulating the minds of other creatures using your abilities. When you use your Compulsion feature on a creature, there are no limitations on the types of places it can move, regardless of how dangerous they may be.

Objects[edit]

Objects in general are the most common things for an interfuse mage to make use of during a battle. Most interfusion mages prefer to specialize with objects due to the simplicity of not actually being very specialized. They come in a wide range of personalities, ranging anywhere from good to evil and from lawful to chaotic, and can be as varied in their ideals as there are stars in the sky. Regardless of this variety, they are all far better at interfusing with and using your standard household object than those who specialize in other types of interfusion, allowing their objects to last longer and hit harder.

Improved Interfusions

Starting when you choose this preference at 2nd level, you have an easier time interfusing with certain objects and using their interfusion options. The Rock Shield and Sharktrap interfusion options can be used as an action or bonus action, and once during each of your turns you can interfuse with a Stone, Tools, or Trap object without using an action or bonus action.

Sustainable Interfusions

Also at 2nd level, your interfusions are less damaging to the objects you use. If an object would lose 2 or more hit points to an interfusion ability you control, it loses 1 less hit point instead.

Insidious Filament

At 6th level, you can strike creatures with bits and pieces of ceramic or metal from a Trap object, polluting their blood with the foreign objects. As an action, the interfused Trap loses 1 hit point and each creature in a 10-foot cube originating from the object must succeed on a Constitution saving throw or take 1d6 poison damage and become poisoned for 1 minute. A creature poisoned in this way can repeat the save at the end of each of its turns, ending the effect on itself on a success.

Stunning Barrage

At 10th level, the tools you interfuse with whip themselves into an even greater frenzy. When you use the Barrage interfusion, a creature that fails its saving throw is also stunned until the end of its next turn.

Shardnado

At 15th level, you can transform broken objects into deadly storms of sharp metal and ceramics. As an action, you can destroy an interfused Trap object that is at less than its maximum hit points and create a 5-foot radius tornado of slashing broken objects that moves to a point within 20 feet of the object. Each creature the tornado passes through must succeed on a Dexterity saving throw or take 2d6 slashing and 1d6 piercing damage. Any creatures the tornado stops on takes the damage on a successful save, and takes the damage again on a failed save. The tornado lasts until the end of your next turn, and any creature that enters the tornado for the first time during its turn or ends its turn in the tornado takes the damage.

Reinforced Interfusion

At 20th level, your interfusions cause the least amount of harm to the objects you use. Every object you interfuse with gains 3 temporary hit points the first time you interfuse with it each day, which last until you end your interfusion with the object. While an interfused object has temporary hit points, if it would be destroyed by the interfusion or would lose more hit points from an interfusion than it has temporary hit points, it instead loses all its temporary hit points and is either not destroyed or loses no further hit points.

Interfusion Examples[edit]

There are a lot of objects and environmental factors to be considered when playing an interfusion mage. Here are some of the common targets for an interfusion and what can be done with them, sorted by the type of interfusion. Some targets have multiple interfusion options, such as a rock that is covered by vines being a single interfusion target for both Plant and Stone, or a lit forge being used as both a Fire and a Stone interfusion. A burning tree could be Fire, Plant, and Wood all at once if it is still alive, while a statue covered in blankets and holding a torch would be Fabric, Fire, and Stone. It is up to the DM to determine the variety of interfusion uses. If something has multiple interfusion options, you can only use the ones you have available to you as determined by your Advanced Interfusions feature, but you only need to be able to use one of those options to interfuse with that object. For example, a pile of books counts as both Book and Tools, but you only need to pick one of those Advanced Interfusions to interfuse with the pile. You just won't be able to use Loredump if you only have access to Tools interfusions.

A smart opponent might try to destroy an object you are interfused with before you can use it again, if they have the intelligence to recognize the threat and how to avoid it. Most objects only have a few hit points, and it's up to the DM to determine how long a specific interfused object or group of objects will last when being either used by an interfusion that is costing the object's hit points or when it is being attacked in an attempt to prevent you from using the object.

Bone

Valid targets for Bone interfusions are skeletons, big eggs, large collections of eggs, and large bones or piles of bones. Most lone bones and eggs are not valid targets for Bone interfusions.

Bones tend to be resilient but break quickly, often lasting only two or three uses before they are destroyed. Though the bones themselves may be hard to break, the act of turning into a giant spike is not gentle. Eggs, however, are fragile, usually breaking after a single use even when interfusing with groups of them.

Book

Valid targets for Book interfusions are piles of books, shelves covered with books, boxes filled with books, massive books, anything with 3 or more average books. Lone books, piles of notes and small books, books with little to no writing in them, and similar instances where there is little knowledge to be contained within the group of papers are not valid targets for Book interfusions.

Books tend to fragile, with single books not worth one use each before they are destroyed. Piles of books have enough knowledge to make use of to be usable as a weapon, typically lasting two to four uses before nothing is left. Nothing is left to read on the pages of a book destroyed in this way.

Fabric

Valid targets for Fabric interfusions include tapestries, piles of cloths, sacks, long ropes, large spiderwebs, anything made of cotton, silk, or another type of fabric. Objects merely covered in webs or with only tiny amounts of fabrics, such as short lengths of rope or balls of string, are not valid targets for Fabric interfusions.

Fabrics tend to be fragile, but all but the smallest quantities of fabric can last several if not almost dozen uses each. However, most objects made of fabric are ruined after just one use and no longer usable as that object. Ropes tend to be the exception with only lengths of the rope being used rather ruining the entire length, even if they only last a few uses before nothing's left to use as rope.

Fire

Valid targets for Fire interfusions are open flames, such as torches, campfires, open lamps, collections of candles, the fire of a forge, and small portions of a larger fire. Flames contained within an object, such as those inside a closed lamp, and massive flames, such as the entirety of a raging wildfire, are not valid targets for Fire interfusions, nor are objects that are merely capable of holding an open flame or being on fire.

Fire is not an object and does not have a physical form, but the objects it sometimes comes from do. Using a Fire interfusion does not harm the object it came from, and whether the Fire's source is fragile or resilient varies.

Liquid

Valid targets for Liquid interfusions are basins of water, water troughs, barrels filled with beer, any artificial object that holds or is filled with a liquid. Puddles, steams, ponds, swimming pools, and similar bodies of water are not valid targets for Liquid interfusions.

Objects that contain Liquid tend to vary between fragile and resilient, from lasting only a couple uses (such as a small basin of water or a single clay pot) to lasting well over a dozen (a large distillery). The larger or more advanced the source object, the more resilient, as increased complexity allows for more unique locations for liquid to burst out of without draining the object.

Plant

Valid targets for Plant interfusions are living plants, such as a bush, sapling, the vines on a rock, large collections of mushrooms, groups of bushes, and large clumps of grass. Dead plants, small collections of Tiny plants (such as the moss on a rock, a vase of flowers, or a small clump of grass), and big trees are not valid targets for Plant interfusions.

Plants tend to vary between fragile and resilient, from shrubs that are sundered quickly to massive hedges that barely even notice the damage. The remaining hit points of a Plant object does not affect the effectiveness of any Wood interfusion options it may have.

Stone

Valid targets for Stone interfusions are large rocks, statues, collections of bricks, the rubble of a fallen house made of stone, anything made in part or wholly of stone. This includes fire places, forges, marble and granite statues, petrified creatures, and large rocks that have been overgrown with plants. Metal, ceramics, glass, crystals, and gemstones are not valid targets for Stone interfusions.

Stones tend to be resilient, lasting several uses despite the damage they take. Smaller stone and fragile statues are often one-trick ponies, but huge rocks, forges, stone columns and the like don't break as easily.

Tools

Valid targets for Tools interfusions are piles of tools, tables covered in tools and books, boxes filled with toys, shelves covered with books, weapon racks, anything with tools in or on them or consisting of tools. A single hammer, a pair of knives, and all things that only have 4 or less tools and tool-like objects, such as weapons and groups of 5 or more nails, are not valid targets for Tools interfusions.

Tools tend to be resilient, but their source is always destroyed in the process of transforming from a pile to a tornado. Hammers, nails, swords, and other tough tools are unharmed, but toys, books, decorations, and the like will most likely be destroyed with their source. Whether the source is just a pile of junk or a bunch of shelves has no bearing on the effectiveness of the interfusion, and if the Tools are on shelves or a table, that object is destroyed, as if it had been used for a Wood interfusion instead.

Trap

Valid targets for Trap interfusions are large ceramic pots, big metal buckets, long metal chains, a collection of smaller pots, metal armor, anything made wholly of ceramic or metal. Metal ores, metal ingots, raw clay, and tools are not valid targets for Trap interfusions.

Trap objects tend to be resilient, but only last one or two uses before they are destroyed. Similarly to bones, even if the origin object is tough, the act of becoming a series of traps is not gentle and breaks the source very quickly.

Wood

Valid targets for Wood interfusions are dead logs, large living trees, chairs, tables, the rubble of a fallen house, carriage wheels, barrels, shelves, hand-pulled carts, and anything that is or is made from wood. Entire vehicles, petrified trees, charcoal, thin wooden poles, tiki torches, and other objects that don't contain much wood or are complex in shape are not valid targets for Wood interfusions.

Wood tend to be resilient, but that is a mute point since the object is destroyed anyways. Even if the object had multiple interfusion types, such as being capable of Stone interfusion abilities, it is completely destroyed, including everything that was a part of it. Rocks part of the object are obliterated, fabrics used on its are torn to shreds, and fires are extinguished. Tools are the exception: they remain unharmed as with the Tools interfusion abilities, with books and the like still being destroyed.

Multiclassing[edit]

Prerequisites. To qualify for multiclassing into the interfusion mage class, you must meet these prerequisites: Intelligence 13

Proficiencies. When you multiclass into the interfusion mage class, you gain the following proficiencies: simple weapons, one skill from the class's skill list

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