Talk:Open Game License v1.0a

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Layman's Terms[edit]

Let me begin by clearly stating: I am not a lawyer. That seems to be everyone's first question when the subject of the Open Gaming License or the d20 trademark arises. With that out of the way, I'll take a shot at explaining, in layman's terms, what this whole open gaming/d20 thing is and how it impacts the average Dungeons & Dragons player.

In order to understand why Wizards of the Coast would create the Open Gaming License we need to start with primary principles. Marcus Aurelius said, "Of all things ask, what does it intrinsically do?" Dungeons & Dragons is a game, and in order for a game to fulfill its function it must be played. Yet one of the primary reasons people report leaving the hobby is because they can't find anyone to play with. To increase the chance of finding someone to play the game with, you need to increase the network of players. Previous D&D business strategy promoted the use of aggressive legal strategies to keep anyone from publishing work that might be compatible with Dungeons & Dragons. In hindsight, this approach only encouraged players to create new game systems for their genres. As a result, new players brought in through those game systems were playing a game that was incompatible with the D&D system, which fragmented the paper-based roleplaying game genre.

There are those who've interpreted the Open Gaming License as a statement that Wizards wants only one gaming system -- d20 -- but that logic is faulty. In fact, even casual research of Wizard's D&D brand management strategy reveals a consistently stated belief that there will always be room for multiple game systems. But instead of a bunch of game systems that are close to D&D, there would be a few systems that vary widely.

The open gaming license (OGL) says, in a nutshell, that you can create any product you want using the core D&D mechanic (what we call the d20 system). You can change any rule you want, you can add any rule you want, you can cover any subject you want. The only thing that you can't do is keep anyone else from using the D&D rules you used or anything you derived from those rules. In other words, you can play with the blocks but you can't tell someone else that they can't play with the blocks as well. In exchange, you don't owe Wizards any money, and Wizards has no approval over your product

What does Wizards get out of this deal? In addition to expanding the network of D&D players, we also created a little trademarked "bug" (logo you can put on products) called "d20." We own this little logo. We get to say who uses this logo and what they can and can't do if they want to use this logo. What this logo means is, "This product is made with the d20 rules system." Everyone in the gaming community has seen this logo and can now identify it, so it has recognition value.

If you want to put this logo on your product, there are some basic ground rules, a few things you must and must not do. You must point people to the Player's Handbook, you must not present character creation rules, and you must use the basic terms of the d20 rules system unchanged (for example, Strength, Dexterity, Constitution, Intelligence, Wisdom and Charisma). Now, just to be clear: You don't have to use the d20 logo on your product. You can simply use the Open Gaming License and ignore the whole d20 logo issue. But so far everyone who has produced a game has felt that the d20 logo is valuable enough to adhere to the few d20 rules.

What about original material that someone creates, like characters or even whole worlds? The OGL and the d20 rules provide for this. Simply maintain some sort of separation between the original material you wish to retain control of (not make open content) and the d20 rules. You could put a shaded box around it or use a different font. Then, when you create a muck monster, the name of the monster and the description are owned by you, but how it works using the d20 system is part of the Open Gaming world. You can still write a story about your muck monster (and no one else can), and you can import it to another rule system if you wish. You own the muck monster 100%. The only part that is open for others to use are the rules using the d20 system that determine its abilities (things like it armor class or how many dice of damage it does). This means that someone could create the yucky monster and give it the same d20 rules as your muck monster. However, they can not use any of the descriptions of the monster you created, or its history, place in the ecological chain, etc.

I have been asked a number of times if, in my personal opinion, the "d20 strategy" has been a success. People point to all of the products flooding the market and think that this must mean that Wizards will cancel the license because surely we didn't intend for other companies to embrace the system to this extent. Well the answer is: Yes, I think the d20 strategy is a huge success, and yes, that is exactly what we hoped would happen. By Anthony

—Valterra Business Manager, Roleplaying Games, [1]

I can see why the legality is disputed. If I am WotC and see that someone reprints word for word information from a book then perhaps that person won't buy that book and sales will fall. Proving that the site and information is causing a loss in sales is very difficult especially in this economy. Here is the opposite side of the coin. I am a member of a wiki site and publish a complete list of spells siting which books they are in. Another person may be tempted to purchase that book thus promoting the sales. Or even with a word-for-word reprint like Unearthed Arcana another user might buy the book because to some, like myself, books are so much easier to flip thru then online pages. This site wants to go on the side of caution and be very conservative in what information would be out there. If I was doing a research paper and pulled info from any WotC books it would be fine. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by Sgnlnnc (talkcontribs) 11:02, 18 January 2009 (MST). Please sign your posts!

I am not exactly sure what you are wondering. D&D Wiki is, for the most part, all homebrew material; licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License 1.3. We only have the source books available which are OGC. I think you are trying to start a discussion about something relating to pirating, which does not relate to D&D Wiki. --Green Dragon 13:11, 18 January 2009 (MST)
Someone opened a discussion on a page I created stating that I am not allowed to reprint the names, portfolios and favoured weapons of the Gods listed in the Player's Handbook or any that are product identity under Faerun / Forgotten Realms, Greyhawk, Eberron or any other Campaign Setting/Product Identity due to OGL. So naturally, I came here. Short of writing WotC myself, I hoped someone here could explain it since I am sure that I am not the only one who has some confusion about this topic. --Kermit 21:23, 18 January 2009 (MST)
I would have to assume that none of the material in questions is made available by the OGL. Try the help section and see if that answers any of your questions. If not, I'm probably not the best person to answer your question. -- Jota 21:40, 18 January 2009 (MST)

Attribution in Copyright Notice[edit]

Discussion moved from User talk:Green Dragon/Archive 18#OGC Procedure. --Green Dragon 15:02, 1 January 2011 (MST)

I'm using OGC in my own project (see Open20) and I am under the impression that I have to amend the "Copyright Notice" section of the OGL to include references to each SRD I use as a basis for my own SRD. This site gives attribution to Wizards of the Coast and then to a bevy of authors of the original SRD. But no information is given on how to attribute the D&D Wiki itself - is this because the D&D Wiki's SRD is solely a copy of the earlier one, so there is no additional copyright to attribute? Since design elements can be copyrighted (at least in some circumstances), even a direct copy of the SRD may be considered to have copyrights distinct from the original (e.g. the layout of charts). How should I attribute D&D Wiki in my own project? Modrobene 14:21, 18 October 2009 (MDT)

I'll start with the classic line: I am not a lawyer. First, I don't see why you're creating your own project? If you use D&D wiki, why not stay here? Secondly, are you trying to make a OGL game system? If that is the case, WikiRPS is available to be started up and all the leg work is already done. If neither of those are the issue, and you're just wanting to properly site items, the SRD is a WotC site and the coding needs to site D&D wiki and ever editor that a page had. This has recently been discussed here in depth, as having the history meets this GNU requirement. However, when you copy from a D&D wiki page to whatever this project of yours is, you're not copying ever edit and contribution it ever had, so that may be against the GNU.
Sorry if I didn't answer your question. Its really ambiguous as to what you're actually asking (at least to me).   Hooper   talk    contribs    email   14:59, 18 October 2009 (MDT)
WikiRPS is not OGC. The SRD is not published by us - it's from Wizards. This should answer your questions. If you are referring to something relating to the GNU FDL that is not this license and should be discussed elsewhere. If wanted I could discuss hosting for you and then you could link to D&D Wiki's SRD through D&DWiki: or who knows what. Let me know if you are interested (comparable to WikiRPS - you would need to deal with the domain name of course...). Of course, since it is a separate website you could use any license you want (GNU FDL is recommend of course, however CC or who knows what works). --Green Dragon 17:43, 18 October 2009 (MDT)
Thanks Green Dragon, that does answer my question. I had looked for something akin to WikiRPS at one point but didn't find it, I will look at it more closely, though I'm not sure it will really meet my needs. Modrobene 19:30, 18 October 2009 (MDT)
I'm talking about your site... That should have answered your SRD questions however if you want your wiki to be hosted I would be more then willing to discuss it for you (free - other then the domain name of course...). It's nice to have a cluster of hosted wiki's (our side) and it's free for you. --Green Dragon 20:09, 20 October 2009 (MDT)
It appears that a recent edit of the 3.5e Open Game Content page appears to be taken whole or in part from my site, the Grand OGL Wiki (DnD Links). The reason I suspect this is because "Steve Russell Presents..." appears on that page. Steve Russell owns Rite Publishing and personally sent me that material to upload on the Grand OGL Wiki. So I think one of your users may have copy/paste that material. If D&D Wiki intends to replicate the Open Game Content from my site here can you make sure that the section 15 for that material appears in your sites open game license. If you wish to contact me about this matter feel free to email me at gedakm@gmail.com. I can put you in contact with Steve Russell if you like as well. -Mark Gedak, DM Sketchpad/Grand OGL Wiki —The preceding unsigned comment was added by GrandOGLWiki (talkcontribs) 01:47, 21 February 2010 (UTC). Please sign your posts!
On closer inspection of the similarities of our page, 3.5e Open Game Content, and theirs, linked above - it seems like we have most of the bigger names where they go a bit more in depth, and that the random Steve Russell Presents is the only shared link that shows a common history of edit. However, I am really confused as to the request to alter our Section 15 of the OGL. In that same sense, we could argue that the entire website Grand OGL Wiki should change theirs as we existed before them. I just don't understand the real problem here. An OGC game is listed on an OGC page, and that is absolutely fine imho.   Hooper   talk    contribs    email   01:53, 21 February 2010 (UTC)
To answer a bit more.
Saying "attribute D&D Wiki" is a very good question. When section 5 is fulfilled and originally from D&D Wiki (a few examples exist) then section 6 needs to be obeyed.
As per section, 6 I think we need to amend the Copyright Notice with regard to each separate OGC thing we add. For example UA needs a section. I do not think Template:OGL Bottom covers this.
Another question: Do we need written permission (section 11)?
I do not think so. We do not market or advertise the OGC, we distribute it. "(c) "Distribute" means to reproduce, license, rent, lease, sell, broadcast, publicly display, transmit or otherwise distribute;", specifically with regard to "publicly display".
With regard "4. Grant and Consideration: In consideration for agreeing to use this License, the Contributors grant You a perpetual, worldwide, royalty-free, non-exclusive license with the exact terms of this License to Use, the Open Game Content."
And "(g) "Use", "Used" or "Using" means to use, Distribute, copy, edit, format, modify, translate and otherwise create Derivative Material of Open Game Content.", mainly with regard to "distribute".
Thoughts? Please correct me where I am wrong. --Green Dragon 21:47, 15 May 2010 (UTC)
No real thoughts here. The legalese makes my head hurt. I do think you have a reasonable interpretation. --Dmilewski 10:18, 18 May 2010 (UTC)
As per section 6 do you think we should add something akin to (or as the 3.5e Open Game Content gets finished):
Tome of Horrors II Copyright 2004, Necromancer Games, Inc.; Author Scott Greene; Additional Authors: Erica Balsley, Kevin Baase, Casey Christofferson, Jim Collura, Meghan Greene, Lance Hawvermale, Travis Hawvermale, Bill Kenower, Patrick Lawinger, Nathan Paul, Clark Peterson, Bill Webb and Monte Cook.
Denizens of Avadnu Copyright 2003, The Inner Circle.
Creature Collection III: Savage Bestiary Copyright 2003, White Wolf Publishing, Inc.
Creature Collection Revised Copyright 2003, White Wolf Publishing, Inc.
Necromancer’s Legacy—Thee Compleat Librum ov Gar’Udok’s Necromantic Artes Copyright 2002, Mystic Eye Games & Ambient Inc.
Spells & Spellcraft Copyright 2002, Fantasy Flight, Inc.
Secret College of Necromancy, Copyright 2002, Green Ronin Publishing; Authors David “Zeb” Cook and Wolfgang Baur.
The Complete Book of Eldritch Might Copyright 2004 Monte J. Cook. All rights reserved.
Creatures of Freeport, Copyright 2004, Green Ronin Publishing, Authors Keith Baker and Graeme Davis.
Oathbound: Domains of the Forge Copyright 2002, Bastion Press, Inc.
Nyambe: African Adventures Copyright 2002, Trident Inc. d/b/a Atlas Games; author Christopher W. Dolunt.
Ancestral Vault copyright 2003, Trident Inc. d/b/a Atlas Games; authors Christopher W. Dolunt and Chris Jones.
Paths of the Magi Copyright 2003, Troll Lord Games; Authors Sean K. Reynolds, Jeff Quick, W. Jason Peck, and Mike McArtor.
Arms and Armor v3.5, Copyright 2004, Bastion Press, Inc.
Relics & Rituals 2: Lost Lore Copyright 2002, White Wolf Publishing, Inc.
Open Game Content from The Penumbra Fantasy Bestiary Copyright 2003, Trident Inc., d/b/a Atlas Games; editor Michelle A. Brown Nephew.
Dragons Copyright 2001, Alderac Entertainment Group, Authors A. A. Acevedo, J. Darby Douglas III, Peter Flanagan, Andrew Getting, Mike Leader, Mike Mearls, jim pinto, Ree Soesbee, Douglas Sun.
Magic of Rokugan Copyright 2002, Alderac Entertainment Group.
Rokugan Copyright 2001, Alderac Entertainment Group.
Undead Copyright 2001, Alderac Entertainment Group; Authors: Noah Dudley, Andrew Getting, Travis Heerman, Mike Mearls, Jim Pinto, Ree Soesbee, Eric Steiger, Douglas Sun and Rich Wulf.
Spells & Magic Copyright 2002, Bastion Press, Inc.
3E Tower Copyright 2000-2002, John T. Dodson; Author: John T. Dodson.
Mythic Races Copyright 2001, Fantasy Flight, Inc.
Spells & Spellcraft Copyright 2002 Fantasy Flight, Inc.
Secret College of Necromancy, Copyright 2002, Green Ronin Publishing, Authors David “Zeb” Cook and Wolfgang Baur.
The Shaman’s Handbook, Copyright 2002, Green Ronin Publishing, Author, Steve Kenson.
Open game content from Encyclopedia Arcane: Necromancy – Beyond the Grave Copyright 2001, Mongoose Publishing.
Open game content from The Quintessential Cleric copyright 2002, Mongoose Publishing.
Open game content from The Quintessential Wizard copyright 2002, Mongoose Publishing.
The Primal Codex Copyright 2001, Netherland Games Inc.
Creature Collection Copyright 2000, Clark Peterson
Creature Collection 2: Dark Menagerie Copyright 2001, White Wolf Publishing, Inc.
Hollowfaust: City of Necromancers Copyright 2001, White Wolf Publishing, Inc.
Mithril: City of the Golem Copyright 2001, White Wolf Publishing, Inc.
Relics & Rituals Copyright 2001, Clark Peterson
Librum Equitis Vol 1 Copyright 2001, Ambient, Inc.; Author Matthew Jason Parent
Thee Compleat Librum ov Gar’Udok’s Necromantic Artes Copyright 2002, Ambient Inc.; Authors M Jason Parent, Denise Robinson, Chester Douglas III
Occult Lore Copyright 2002, Trident Inc. d/b/a Atlas Games; authors Keith Baker, Adam Bank, Chris Jones, Scott Reeves, and Elton Robb.
Original Spell Name Compendium Copyright 2002 Clark Peterson; based on NPC-named spells from the Player’s Handbook that were renamed in the System Reference Document. The Compendium can be found on the legal page of www.necromancergames.com.
The Wise & the Wicked Copyright 2001, White Wolf Publishing, Inc.
The Divine and the Defeated Copyright 2001, White Wolf Publishing, Inc.
Burok Torn: City Under Siege Copyright 2002, White Wolf Publishing, Inc.
Vigil Watch: Warren of the Ratmen Copyright 2002, White Wolf Publishing, Inc.
Secrets & Societies Copyright 2002, White Wolf Publishing, Inc.
Wilderness & Wasteland Copyright 2002, White Wolf Publishing, Inc.
Scarred Lands Campaign Setting: Ghelspad Copyright 2001, White Wolf Publishing, Inc.
Serpent in the Fold: Serpent Amorpha Cycle, Book I Copyright 2002, White Wolf Publishing, Inc.
Calastia: Throne of the Black Dragon Copyright 2002, White Wolf Publishing, Inc.
Scarred Lands Gazetteer: Termana Copyright 2002, White Wolf Publishing, Inc.
The Serpent and the Scepter: Serpent Amorpha Cycle, Book II Copyright 2002, White Wolf Publishing, Inc.
Hornsaw: Forest of Blood Copyright 2002, White Wolf Publishing, Inc.
The Penumbral Pentagon Copyright 2003, White Wolf Publishing, Inc.
Shelzar: City of Sin Copyright 2003, White Wolf Publishing, Inc.
The Serpent Citadel: Serpent Amorpha Cycle, Book III Copyright 2003, White Wolf Publishing, Inc.
Blood Bayou Copyright 2003, White Wolf Publishing, Inc.
Player’s Guide to Wizards, Bards, and Sorcerers Copyright 2003, White Wolf Publishing, Inc.
Player’s Guide to Fighters and Barbarians Copyright 2003, White Wolf Publishing, Inc.
Player’s Guide to Clerics and Druids Copyright 2003, White Wolf Publishing, Inc.
Player’s Guide to Rangers and Rogues Copyright 2003, White Wolf Publishing, Inc.
Scarred Lands Campaign Setting: Termana Copyright 2003, White Wolf Publishing, Inc.
Vigil Watch: Secrets of the Asaatthi Copyright 2003, White Wolf Publishing, Inc.
The Faithful and the Forsaken Copyright 2003, White Wolf Publishing, Inc.
If Thoughts Could Kill Copyright 2002 Bruce R. Cordell. All Rights Reserved.
Broadsides!: Naval Adventuring copyright 2003, Living Imagination, Inc.
Freeport The City of Adventure, Copyright 2002, Green Ronin Publishing ; Authors Matt Forbeck and Chris Pramas.
The Book of Eldritch Might Copyright 2001-3 Monte J. Cook. All Rights Reserved.
The Book of Eldritch Might II: Songs and Souls of Power Copyright 2002-3 Monte J. Cook. All rights reserved.
The Book of Eldritch Might III: The Nexus Copyright 2003 Monte J. Cook. All rights reserved.
Monte Cook’s Arcana Unearthed Copyright 2003 Monte J. Cook. All rights reserved.
Modern System Reference Document Copyright 2002, Wizards of the Coast, Inc.; Authors Bill Slavicsek, Jeff Grubb, Rich Redman, Charles Ryan, based on material by Jonathan Tweet, Monte Cook, Skip Williams, Richard Baker, Peter Adkinson, Bruce R. Cordell, John Tynes, Andy Collins and JD Wiker
Alchemy & Herbalists Copyright 2002, Bastion Press, Inc.
Arcana: Societies of Magic, Copyright 2001, Kevin Brennan and James Maliszewski
Armies of the Abyss, Copyright 2002, Green Ronin Publishing; Author Erik Mona
Arms & Armor, Copyright 2001, Bastion Press, Inc.
Artifacts of the Ages: Swords and Staves Copyright 2003, The Game Mechanics, Inc.; Authors JD Wiker and Rich Redman
Bestiary of Loerem, Copyright 2002, Sovereign Press
Book of Erotic Fantasy, Copyright 2003, Valar Project, Inc.
Bow & Blade: A Guidebook to Wood Elves, Copyright 2003, Green Ronin Publishing; Authors Jesse Decker and Chris Thomasson
Codex Arcanis, Copyright 2001, Paradigm Concepts, Inc.; Author Scott Charlton, Brian Dalrymple, Jarad Fennell, Matt Forbek, Shawn Havraneck, Henry Lopez, William Simoni, Eric Weiner, based upon the original concept by Henry Lopez.
Common Ground II – Guard Towers, Private Clubs and Thieves Guild Copyright 2002, Bard’s Productions, LLC
Creature Catalog, Copyright 2001, Scott Greene, http://www.enworld.org/cc
Crime and Punishment, Copyright 2003, Trident, Inc. d/b/a Atlas Games; Author Keith Baker
d20 Firearm Mechanics, Copyright 2001, Kenneth S. Hood
d20 Skills-n-Feats Martial Arts System, Copyright 2001, Kenneth S. Hood
d20 Skills-n-Feats Psionics System, Copyright 2001, Kenneth S. Hood
Dark Walkers Copyright 2003, Mystic Eye Games; Authors Steven Creech and Kevin Ruesch
Dawnforge Copyright 2003, Fantasy Flight Publishing, Inc.
Deadlands d20 Copyright 2001, Pinnacle Entertainment Group, Inc.
Death in Freeport, Copyright 2000, Green Ronin Publishing
Diomin, Copyright 2000, OtherWorld Creations, Inc.
Dragonstar: Starfarer’s Handbook Copyright 2001, Fantasy Flight Publishing, Inc.
Dungeons, Copyright 2000, Alderac Entertainment Group
Dynasties and Demagogues, Copyright 2003, Trident, Inc. d/b/a Atlas Games; Author Chris Aylott
Egyptian Gods, Copyright 2002, Bastion Press
Eldest Sons: The Essential Guide to Elves, Copyright 2002, Paradigm Concepts, Inc.
e-Minions: Cunning Creatures, copyright 2001, Bastion Press
Encyclopaedia Arcane: Demonology Copyright 2001, Mongoose Publishing
Evil, Copyright 2001, Alderac Entertainment Group
Fading Suns d20, Copyright 2001, Holistic Design, Inc; Authors Bill Bridges and Andy Harmon
Faeries Copyright 2003, Bastion Press, Inc.
Forbidden Kingdoms, Copyright 2002, OtherWorld Creations, Inc.
Forged in Magic, Copyright 2002, Paradigm Concepts, Inc.
From to Steel Copyright 203, MonkeyGod Enterprises LP.
Good, Copyright 2003, Alderac Entertainment Group
Grim-n-Gritty Hit Point and Combat Rules, Copyright 2001, Kenneth S. Hood
Hammer & Helm: A guidebook to Dwarves, Copyright 2002, Green Ronin Publishing; Author Jesse Decker
Interludes: Brief Expeditions to Bluffside Copyright 2001, Thunderhead Games, Inc.
Into the Black Copyright 2003, Bastion Press, Inc.
Into the Green Copyright 2003, Bastion Press, Inc.
Jade Dragons and Hungry Ghosts, Copyright 2001, Green Ronin Publishing; Authors Wolfgang Baur, David “Zeb” Cook, Erik Mona, Leon Phillips, Chris Pramas, and Steven E. Schend
Legions of Hell, Copyright 2001, Green Ronin Publishing; Author Chris Pramas
Love and War, copyright 2004, Trident, Inc. d/b/a Atlas Games; Author David Chart
Magus, Copyright 2001, Hector Hernandez
Masters of Arms Copyright 2002, Steven Palmer Peterson.
Mercenaries, Copyright 2002, Alderac Entertainment Group
Minions: Fearsome Foes, Copyright 2001, Bastion Press
Monster, Copyright 2002, Alderac Entertainment Group
Mutants & Masterminds RPG, Copyright 2002, Green Ronin Publishing; Author Steve Kenson
Nightmares & Dreams: A Creature Collection, Copyright 2001, Mystic Eye Games
Nightmares & Dreams II: A Creature Collection, Copyright 2002, Mystic Eye Games
Oathbound: The Plains of Penance, Copyright 2003, Bastion Press
Oathbound: Wrack & Ruin, Copyright 2003, Bastion Press
Open Game Content from Seas of Blood – Fantasy on the High Seas Copyright 2001, Mongoose Publishing
Open Game Content from Seven Strongholds Copyright 2002, Trident Inc. d/b/a Atlas Games; author Robin D. Laws
Open Game Content from The Tide of Years, Copyright 2001, Michelle A. Brown Nephew
Pale Designs: A Poisoner’s Handbook, Copyright 2002, Bastion Press
Path of Faith Copyright 2002, Fantasy Flight Publishing, Inc.
Path of Shadow, Copyright 2002, Fantasy Flight Publishing, Inc
Path of the Magi, Copyright 203, Troll Lord Games; Authors Sean K. Reynolds, Jeff Quick, W. Jason Peck and Mike McArtor
Path of the Sword Copyright 2002, Fantasy Flight Publishing, Inc.
Plot & Poison: A Guidebook to Drow, Copyright 2002, Green Ronin Publishing; Author Matthew Sernett
Seafarer’s Handbook, Copyright 2001, Fantasy Flight Publishing, Inc.
Spycraft, Copyright 2002, Alderac Entertainment Group
Swashbuckler, Copyright 2001, Felix Lim Jr.
Testament: Roleplaying in the Biblical Era copyright 2003, Green Ronin Publishing; Author Scott Bennie
The Assassin’s Handbook, Copyright 2002, Green Ronin Publishing; Authors Wolfgang Bauer and David “Zeb” Cook
The Book of the Righteous, Copyright 2002, Aaron Loeb
The Codex Compendium, Copyright 2002, Paradigm Concepts, Inc.
The Devil Player’s Guide Copyright 2003, Fast Forward Entertainment, Inc.
The Lore of the Gods: The Asgardians, copyright 2002, Bastion Press
The Lore of the Gods: The Olympians, copyright 2002, Bastion Press
The Quintessential Rogue, Copyright 2002, Mongoose Publishing
The Tomb of Abysthor Copyright 2001, Necromancer Games, Inc., Authors Clark Peterson and Bill Webb
The Unholy Warrior’s Handbook, Copyright 2003, Green Ronin Publishing; Author Robert J. Schwalb
The Village of Briarton Copyright 2003 by Gold Rush Games; Authors Patrick Sweeney, Christina Stiles; Editing and Additional material by Spike Y. Jones
The Witch’s Handbook, Copyright 2002, Green Ronin Publishing; Author Steve Kenson
Tome of Horrors, Copyright 2002, Necromancer Games Inc., Author Scott Greene, based upon original material by Nigel Morgan
Torn Asunder: Critical Hits, Copyright 2003, Bastion Press, Inc.
Tournaments, Fairs, and Taverns, Copyright 2002, Natural 20 Press
Traps & Treachery Copyright 2001, Fantasy Flight Publishing, Inc.
Uncommon Character Copyright 2003, Trident Inc., d/b/a/ Atlas Games
Undead, Copyright 2000, Alderac Entertainment Group
Unearthed Arcana, Copyright 2004, Wizards of the Coast, Inc.; Authors Andy Collins, Jesse Decker, David Noonan, and Rich Redman
Villains, Copyright 2002, Bastion Press, Inc.
Vitality and Wound Points, A d20 System Conversion Guide, Copyright 2000 by Bradley D Thompson
War, Copyright 2002, Alderac Entertainment Group
Way of the Witch, Copyright 2002, Citizen Games; Authors Janet Pack, Jean Rabe, Megan Robertson, and Christina Stiles
Waysides: Book of Taverns Copyright 2003, Eden Studios, Inc.
Weird Wars, Weird War Two, Copyright 2001, Pinnacle Entertainment Group, Inc.
Wild Spellcraft, Copyright 2002, Natural 20 Press
Wrath & Rage: A Guidebook to Orcs and Half-orcs, Copyright 2002, Green Ronin Publishing; Author Jim Bishop
Dread Codex, copyright 2005 Adamant Entertainment. Author: Bret Boyd.
Also the NBoF and all the other things we have added throughout time and not documented. Found through Special:WhatLinksHere/Template:OGL Bottom. Or maybe you documented some things? --Green Dragon 15:56, 18 May 2010 (UTC)
I just wanted to note that I can't find my way around that "Grand OGL Wiki" at all. No easy to comprehend navigation, and a horrible layout.   Hooper   talk    contribs    email   07:46, 2 January 2011 (MST)

size[edit]

just saying the sizes are incorrect i was just looking at draconimacon and mm and the starting size for wrymling was small —The preceding unsigned comment was added by Lordspartan4 (talkcontribs) . Please sign your posts!

I think you are on the wrong page. JazzMan 10:04, 17 December 2010 (MST)
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