Ability Score Adjustments- Point System (3.5e Variant Rule)

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Ability Score Adjustments - Point System (3.5e Variant Rule)[edit]

The purpose of this system is to allow players to adjust their ability scores in order to create the character they desire without rerolling their player incessantly. It is similar to the ability score adjustment system in the Baldur's Gate videogames, but seeks more balance than the simple 1:1 tradeoff. At the same time, it is more forgiving than the system offered in the Dungeon Master's Guide (page 169).

Steps

1. Create ability scores using the system you normally use - the standard rolls, score arrays, etc.

2. Use the base scores before any adjustment such as for racial modifiers. Players must lower some scores to generate reserve points which they can use to increase others. Scores further away from the average ability scores result in more reserve points being generated for dropping scores as well as cost more for increasing them. You adjust each score by one point at a time, however you may continue to do so until you hit the minimum or maximum value. No score may fall below 1; if the player will be applying a racial modifier that will reduce the score below one, they may not reduce it below the point where the score would be less than 1 after the modifier is applied. If the player will be playing a creature without a certain ability score - such as an undead creature which does not have a constitution score - they may apply their lowest score to that ability, but may not reduce it below 10 in exchange for reserve points. The following table shows how many points are gained from reducing a score by one point.

Starting Score End Score Reserve Points Gained
18 17 5
17 16 4
16 15 4
15 14 3
14 13 3
13 12 2
12 11 2
11 10 1
10 9 1
9 8 2
8 7 2
7 6 3
6 5 3
5 4 4
4 3 4
3 2 5
2 1 5

The accumulated reserve points are then spent on raising other points. These numbers are all reflexive - decreasing one score and increasing it again provides the same value as if no change was ever made. The following table shows how many reserve points are spent to increase the ability score. Follow the pattern for higher scores.

Starting Score End Score Reserve Point Cost
3 4 4
4 5 4
5 6 3
6 7 3
7 8 2
8 9 2
9 10 1
10 11 1
11 12 2
12 13 2
13 14 3
14 15 3
15 16 4
16 17 4
17 18 5
18 19 5
19 20 6
20 21 6
21 22 7
22 23 7
23 24 8
24 25 8
25 26 9

If a player can spend reserve points on increasing a stat, they must do so. Players are not required to adjust these scores in such a way that there is no remainder, but any score can be increased by spending the reserve points they have on hand - without reducing another score - they must increase scores until they no longer may do so with the points they have on hand.

3. If there are any reserve points left over with that process, the player is awarded one quarter of the experience to advance to the next level for each remaining reserve point. Players with 4 or more reserve points, if that is possible, may trade four in at once for a level adjustment instead of a level. For example, a level 1 party might not allow races with even a +1 level adjustment which would grant the player with an ECL of 2. A player who has four or more reserve points may play a race with a level adjustment of +1.

4. Now any modifiers are applied, such as racial modifiers or the removal of ability scores outright.


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