Immortality (Inath Supplement)

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The Soul and the body are not one unit, but a sort of symbiotic relationship between the spiritual and physical realms of Self. The notes cited here are to help understand how one attains Immortality in its varying forms.

Mortality[edit]

If one has a Mortal Body and a Mortal Soul, they will find themselves lost to the powers of the Vast upon death, and often do not return in any form. Many of these individuals come from cursed bloodlines, lineages who have sought no form or afterlife, or those whose sacrilege went so deep that their Immortal Souls were stricken from them.

Those individuals not blessed with an immortal soul often have no concept of the afterlife, or have been cursed as a lineage since before they were born. The Vashar (Book of Vile Darkness) are a perfect example of this, since they have shunned the worship of deities and divine powers of all forms since their creation. They have no inherent Divine Spark, and must have their curse dispelled and receive an initiation into immortality to acquire one. Constructs have no inherent Divine Spark, and neither do most Aberrations of any given culture. This is not permanent in most cases. There is thus far no soul which has been denied a Divine Spark for any reason documented in any copies of the Great Tome of Prophecy, the Grammaticum Primeaval. That is not to say the documentation could be wrong, changed, corrupted, or a downright lie told by pious Clerics of the Immortal Temple. Vermin are not known to have Immortal Souls, but they can receive them like any other mortal race.

Key definitions of mortality: - Mortal Body / Soul: Having a mortal body means that you must eat, sleep, drink and eventually – because of old age or circumstance – you must die. In those who believe in the spirit within the body, the physical host of the soul is the carnal temple, or vessel for the spiritual energies lying beneath the flesh. Long lifespans can sometimes be mistaken for having immortal bodies, but it is not often the case that a body remains intact for all time. Most humanoids have an Immortal Soul, as a general rule. Those individuals not blessed with an immortal soul often have no concept of the afterlife, do not collectively believe in existence of any form after death, or have been cursed as a lineage since before they were born. The Vashar (Book of Vile Darkness) are a perfect example of this, since they have shunned the worship of deities and divine powers of all forms since their creation. They have no inherent Divine Spark, and must have their curse dispelled and receive an initiation into immortality to acquire one. Constructs have no inherent Divine Spark, and neither do most Aberrations of any given culture. This is not permanent in most cases. There is thus far no soul which has been denied a Divine Spark for any reason documented in any copies of the Great Tome of Prophecy, the Grammaticum Primeaval. That is not to say the documentation could be wrong, changed, corrupted, or a downright lie told by pious Clerics of the Immortal Temple. Vermin are not known to have Immortal Souls, but they can receive them like any other mortal race. Halflings believe in the beauty of life, and revere a creator god as well as a racial pantheon, but believe collectively that an afterlife consists of returning from the energies that one came from, and that survival in life is the only rational option. Family and home life are more respected because of this ideal, and evolution has taken a turn toward the lucky side to make due for this lack in a belief in the afterlife. Some Halflings do not believe in this state of existence, and some are simply to proud to admit that they will ever die, instead attaining immortality through divine, occult or necromantic means. All humans have an inherently Immortal Soul. o Sample Artifact / Relic – Grammaticum Primeaval


Immortal Soul[edit]

Most races (even most animals and magical beasts) are thought to have immortal or semi-immortal souls, which often means that an afterlife of sorts is granted to them, either in the form of a heavenly (or hellish) Outer Realm experience after death, or in the form of reincarnation, which keeps immortal souls bound in cyclical reformation in lifetimes between periods of time known as “being on the Other Side.” This can be a heavenly (or hellish) experience, or a period of time un-incarnated as simply soul energy, or becoming a part of the cosmos between lifetimes within a body (often called a “Carnal Temple”). Certain life-forms have very intricate and dedicated processes to go through between lives, while others are simpler and bear little resemblance to the humanoid races which most clerics are familiar with. Even rarer are those races with a distinctly differing incarnation cycle, or those who attend very differing activities beyond the realm of death.

Immortal souls, if not granted by race, are granted at the Inath level, Byrnah, of the Ghimhara Caste.


Immortal Body (3 forms)[edit]

  1. will not age naturally (gained at Imburith Caste, Akesda Level)
  2. no need for sleep (gained at Imburith Caste, Pyrurin Level)
  3. no need to eat or drink (gained at Imburith Caste, Algareth Level)

Magical forms of these activities can still affect Inath characters unless otherwise noted, or another further ability changes this. For example, though a Pyrurin Level Inath Character would not need to sleep in order to continue functioning properly, magical Sleep Spells and abilities would still affect her until she achieved an ability which granted her immunity to such abilities.



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