Gear (Zyanya Supplement)

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Raw Materials[edit]

Actar 300/Pound Amber colored crystal, literally the crystalized remnants of the poisonous breath weapon some creature used.

Arcanum 600/Pound Extremely magickal golden metal, used by Elven arch-mages to make magical items

Blackcoral 0.6/Pound A stone found in the ocean, similar in property to obsidian

Bloodsteel 50/Pound Steel slaked in the blood of a sentient during its forging. The steel is tinged red. Possession of bloodsteel is a heinous crime in many areas.

Blueleaf 1/Pound Brilliant blue hardwood

Bluesteel 20/Pound A dark blue high quality metal, secrets of which are only known to dwarven mastersmiths.

Cuprum 300/Pound An alchemic metal, coppery in color. Only formed through alchemic processes, is highly prized in the discipline of alchemy and in ritualistic magick.

Darksteel 50/Pound Black metal, magickal in nature. Strongly tied to dark magic, the metal often appears to be a black void, a hole or a tear in the fabric of reality.

Darkwood 0.06/Pound Dark gray hardwood

Drathian 80/Pound A dull gray metal, very hard to forge.

Emiel 75/Pound A brilliant pure white metal

Grimsilver 500/Pound Dark grey metal, only found where the veil between worlds is thin and tainted by chaos and darkness.

Luminar 500/Pound A pale gold metal, naturally luminescent. Infused with light and the essense of order.

Moonsilver 600/Pound A glimmering pale silver metal, slightly luminous.

Morbius 0.8/Pound A dark green quartz-like stone. Like flint, can be chipped to make razor-sharp edges.

Orichalcum 1000/Pound A dark golden metal, inherently magickal. Prized by mages as it is one of the most resiliant magickal metals known.

Runesilver 15/Pound Silvery-white metal

Shadowglass 40/Pound Grayish-black translucent metal does not reflect light, instead it draws light into itself, deepening the shadows around it.

Shardwood 0.6/Pound Wood sometimes used for arrows due to its habit of shattering into many wickedly sharp pieces upon impact

Starsteel 750/Pound An ore found in fallen stars. It is mirror-like when polished and is naturally a bluish-silver color.

Steelwood 1/Pound Hardwood similar in strength to steel.

Winterstone 30/Pound Pure white metal that never warms to the touch

Alcohol[edit]

Drink Sizes[edit]

Servings of alcohol are measured in ‘shots.’ A ‘shot’ does not denote any real-world significance; rather, it is simply a convenient word to measure small volumes of liquid in game terms. The number of shots contained in various drinking vessels is as follows.

Size Shots
Shot glass/mouthful 1
Small glass (cup) 2
Mug/glass (pint) 4
Wineskin (pint) 4
Large Flagon (quart) 8
Jug (two quarts) 16
Large Pitcher (gallon) 32
Keg (3 gallons) 96
Small Barrel (10 gallons) 320
Large Barrel (40 gallons) 1280

Drink Strengths[edit]

The strength of the drink is measured on a scale, with 0 being no alcohol content, and 10 or higher being powerful beverages. The following table should not be regarded as a definitive list of drinks, but rather a rough guide to how to use Alcohol Strengths.

Type Strength
Water 0
Weak Beer 1
Regular Beer 2
Wine 4
Strong Wine 6
Spirit 10
Strong Spirit 12
Dwarf Spirits 14

A drink’s total effect is measured in Alcohol Units (AU). The alcohol units of a given drink is the product of its number of shots times its strength. For example, a mug (4 shots) of wine (Strength 4) is a total of 16 AU.

Effect of Alcohol[edit]

Alcohol is, basically, a poison. The more you drink, the greater effect it has. There are several levels of intoxication, each accompanied by penalties to certain abilities, and a slight bonus to resist pain. If you are using the wild spellcasting rules from Wild Spellcraft, then a spellcaster who fails a spell because of drunkeness causes a mishap.

  • Tipsy: Judgment slightly impaired, but no noticeable effects. -1 penalty to attack rolls, skill checks, ability checks, and Reflex saves. No effect on movement or hit points. Must make a Concentration check (DC 10 +spell level)* to cast spells or take similar actions.
  • Merry: Inhibitions lower, voices raise, and balance wavers slightly. -2 penalty to attack rolls, skill checks, ability checks, and Reflex saves. +1 temporary hit point per hit die. No effect on movement. Must make a Concentration check (DC 10 +spell level)* to cast spells or take similar actions.
  • Drunk: Dizzy and disoriented, words slurred. -4 penalty to attack rolls, skill checks, ability checks, and Reflex saves. +2 temporary hit points per hit die. Can safely take one partial action each round, but must make a Balance check (DC 10)* to both move and take an action. Falls down on a failure. Must make a Concentration check (DC 10 + spell level)* to cast spells or take similar actions.
  • Hammered: Can’t walk in a straight line, generally incoherent. -8 penalty to attack rolls, skill checks, ability checks, and Reflex saves. +3 temporary hit points per hit die. Can safely take one partial action per round, but must make a Balance check (DC 10)* to both move and take an action. Falls down on a failure. Must make a Concentration check (DC 10 +spell level)* to cast spells or take similar actions.
  • Plastered: Communication is nearly impossible, as is standing up. -16 penalty to attack rolls, skill checks, ability checks, and Reflex saves (though the character can take no actions, so it usually doesn’t matter). +4 temporary hit points per hit die (but usually unable to take advantage of this). He must make a Concentration check (DC 10)* to cast spells or take similar actions. Character is nauseated, and the only action he can normally take is a single move or move-equivalent action per round. A character who is plastered can, however, choose to take one partial action other than a movement, but is then stunned for the next 1d6 rounds.
  • Unconscious: Character is unconscious, usually from sickness or extreme dizziness and confusion.

Getting Drunk[edit]

An average person’s Alcohol threshold is equal to his Constitution score, but this number can modified by several other factors. Any racial, magical, or class-based bonuses to resist poison add to this number, the Endurance feat adds +4 to this number, and the Hard Drinking feat doubles a character’s Alcohol threshold (Constitution score and all other modifiers are doubled).

For each size category smaller than Medium-size that you are, your Alcohol threshold is reduced by half. For each size category larger, double your Alcohol threshold. For example, the Alcohol threshold of the average Halfling is only 5, whereas a Great Wyrm Red Dragon would have an Alcohol threshold of 496.

Once you reach your Alcohol threshold, you become Tipsy. As you drink more, you progress through the various levels of intoxication, with a number of AU equal to your threshold increasing your drunkeness to the next category.

For example, Seth has a Constitution of 14. He drinks two shots of whiskey (12 AU each, total 24 AU). this exceeds his Alcohol threshold, so he becomes Tipsy. Another 4 AU will take him to 28, putting him in the Merry category.

the game master may give a temporary bonus to a character’s alcohol threshold of up to +2 from various factors, such as a full stomach or magical enhancements.

Drinking Too Fast[edit]

A medium size character can drink 2 shots as a move-equivalent action. Double this number for each size category above Medium and halve it for each category below Medium as indicated in the table below. A character can drink double the amount indicated in a full round.

Size Drink as move-equivalent action Alcohol threshold
Tiny 1⁄2 1⁄4 Con score
Small 1 1⁄2 Con score
Medium 2 Con score
Large 4 2 × Con score
Huge 8 4 × Con score
Gargantuan 16 8 × Con score
Colossal 32 16 × Con score

Attempting to drink more than this in one go requires a Fortitude save (DC 10 +4 per extra multiple or part thereof). A failure means that the character cannot swallow fast enough, and a failure by 5 or more causes the character to also lose his action the next round from gagging. In most drinking contests, this automatically means that the character has lost.

Additionally, sometimes an overdose of strong drink can shock a person’s system. If a character drinks too much too quickly, there is a danger of him passing out or getting sick right away. If a charater drinks more AU than twice his Alcohol threshold in one round, he must make a Fortitude save (DC 20). If he fails the save, he either vomits out what he just drank, or falls unconscious (the GM gets to choose).

Recovery & Hangovers[edit]

A character recovers at a rate of 8 Alcohol Units per hour. Additionally, eight hours of uninterrupted sleep enables him to recover completely. A character who has become Drunk or higher suffers a hangover once he sobers up. A hangover consists of headaches, nausea and other unpleasant side effects. After recovering from drunkeness, a hangover begins. While hung over, a character suffers the same penalty to his attack rolls, skill checks, ability checks, and Reflex saves of the drunkeness category he reached the night before. Every two hours, the severity reduces by one category until the penalties go away.

Sobering Quickly[edit]

A successful fortitude save vs DC 14+1 per level of drunkenness can reduce penalties by one level. This only works once.

Types of Alcohol[edit]

Treasure[edit]


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